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ZAK | Centre for Cultural and General Studies

Rüppurrer Straße 1a, Haus B

D-76137 Karlsruhe

Tel.: +49 721 608-44384
Fax: +49 721 608-44811
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Swenja Zaremba
Swenja Zaremba M.A.
Intercultural projects, coordination of the German network of the Anna Lindh Foundation

swenja.zaremba@kit edu

Phone: 0721 608-44797


Judith Milz
Interculturality and Globalisation

judith milzVpz3∂partner kit edu

Phone: 0721-60841820

World Science Café

In the event series World Science Café, fled and threatened scientists offer insights into their research

Since the winter term of 2016/17, the ZAK, in cooperation with the International Scholars & Welcome Office (IScO) has been hosting a new series of events during which refugees report about their scientific work. In line with the title-giving café concept, a brief outline will be followed by a discussion about the state of academia in the speakers’ country of origin, in dialogue with a partner who is familiar with the situation in the respective country. What are the consequences a society faces when scientists are unable to continue research in their own country? How can threatened scientists be enabled to continue their work in Germany? How do they enrich and amplify the academic world and German society?

The Philipp Schwartz Initiative was launched by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation together with the German Federal Foreign Office. It enables universities, universities of applied science, and independent research institutions to grant threatened researchers fellowships for research stays in Germany. The initiative has been made possible through generous support from the Federal Foreign Office, the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the Gerda Henkel Foundation, the Klaus Tschira Foundation, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Stifterverband, and the Stiftung Mercator.

World Science Café winter term of 2016/17

 

Programme:

Tuesday, 12 December 2017, 6 pm
Dr. Anan Alsheikh Haidar
Institute for International Peace and Security Law and Department of Oriental Studies, University of Cologne

Dr. Housamedden Darwish
Assistant Professor at the Department of Oriental Studies of Cologne University and at the Department of Philosophy of Duisburg-Essen University, Germany

Wednesday, 07 February 2017, 6 pm
Afaf Rahim
Institute for World Economics, University of Kiel

 

 

The Syrian Crisis – A Philosophical and Legal Overview

Tuesday, 12 December 2017, 6 pm, Venue: Foyer of the Presidential Building (Adolf Würth Building, bldg. 11.30), Ehrenhof, Engelbert-Arnold-Str. 2, KIT Campus South - Campus Map (pdf, approx. ca.1 MB)

  In March 2011, a peaceful uprising against the government erupted in Syria, which Syrian security men and troops under Bashar al-Assad cruelly and quickly suppressed. The brutal suppression of the peaceful protesters caused more violence to escalate and led the country into a conflict. This conflict has created one of the worst humanitarian crises in the 21st century. About half a million people were killed. 11 million people – about half of the Syrian population – have fled their homes and more than 13 million people are in urgent need of assistance. The violence continues in Syria, and war crimes and crimes against humanity have been committed. Different names have been used to label the Syrian crisis, namely civil war, proxy war, and revolution. In this context, the question arises which name or names best express what has been happening in Syria. The Syrian crisis – under whatever label – poses another important question relating to justice: What are the possibilities of bringing those who committed crimes in Syria to justice?
In order to answer the aforementioned questions, the talk starts with discussing the names labelling the Syrian revolution in attempt to understand this crisis. Secondly, it will explore the prospects of pursuing international criminal justice in the Syrian case.
Dr. Anan Alsheikh Haidar

Dr. Anan Alsheikh Haidar

Institute for International Peace and Security Law and Department of Oriental Studies, University of Cologne

Dr Anan Alsheikh Haidar, born in 1977, studied at the Law School of Damascus University, Syria, and received her Diploma in Law in 2000. In 2005, she earned her Master of Laws (LL.M.) in Advanced Legal Studies as Chevening Scholar at the Law School of Reading University, UK, which was followed by her PhD in Law in 2010 in the principal subjects of International Criminal Law and International Human Rights Law, Research Methods and International Security Studies. She worked as lecturer at the Law School of Damascus University from 2010 to 2014 as well as at the Syrian Virtual University. Dr. Haidar has issued publications on International Law and has participated in lectures worldwide, most recently about the Syrian Conflict and International Criminal Law. Since 2016, she has been a research fellow at the Institute of International Peace and Security Law of Cologne University, Germany.

Dr. Anan Alsheikh Haidar

Dr. Housamedden Darwish

Assistant Professor at the Department of Oriental Studies of Cologne University and at the Department of Philosophy of Duisburg-Essen University, Germany.

Dr Housamedden Darwish, born in 1971, studied Philosophy at Tishreen University in Latakia, Damascus University, and Aleppo University in Syria. He earned his Master degree in Philosophy at Bordeaux University which was followed in 2010 by his PhD in Philosophy on the French philosopher Paul Ricœur. He worked as freelance researcher, visiting researcher, and teaching assistant on the subjects of Eastern philosophy and the Arab uprising, and on transcultural concepts, as well as on Islam and Political Modernity. Dr Darwish participated in presentations and panel discussions worldwide, with a focus on the Syrian philosopher, professor, and human rights activist Sadiq Jalal al-Azm. He has numerous publications in magazines about the situation in Syria, about an uprooted nation, and the Arabic state of mind. Furthermore, he published several books about the French philosopher Paul Ricœur as well as ‘Critical Texts on Arab Political Thought, Syrian Revolution and Asylum’ (Beirut: Arab Scientific Publishers Inc, 2017). Currently, Dr. Darwish is a fellow of the Volkswagen Foundation project ‘A Study in Explanatory Power’, as well as Assistant Professor at the Department of Oriental Studies of Cologne University and at the Department of Philosophy of Duisburg-Essen University, Germany.

 

Refugees and Migrants – Social and Economic Integration

Wednesday, 07 February 2017, 6 pm, Venue: Foyer of the Presidential Building (Adolf Würth Building, bldg. 11.30), Ehrenhof, Engelbert-Arnold-Str. 2, KIT Campus South - Campus Map (pdf, approx. ca.1 MB)

 Afaf Rahim

Afaf Rahim

Institute for World Economics, University of Kiel

Labour market integration is the overarching goal of immigrants’ integration – specifically in the case of refugees and family migrants. Social integration represents an equally important concern, in particular given that concerns of the native population are often related to non-economic factors. The causal relationship between economic and social integration, however, has not been established. There are two competing contentions about the link between immigrants’ labour market outcome and social integration. The first claims that better social integration is associated with higher chances of labour market success, the second argues that unequal economic opportunities and structural constraints that alienate immigrants from the job market also reduce their incentives to adapt to the host society’s norms and cultures. In this talk, I will take a look at the interaction between economic and social integration of third country nationals (refugees and migrants). I will focus particularly on refugees’ labour market integration barriers and on two important policy related questions: 1) Could policies aimed at facilitating refugees' and migrants' employment also have a positive effect on social integration? 2) Are there additional unemployment costs for immigrants (e.g. caused by social disintegration)?

Afaf Rahim is a researcher at the Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW). She is part of the research team working on the MEDAM project (Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration). Within MEDAM, Rahim’s research focuses on the economic and social integration of immigrants. Rahim holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Wageningen; she previously worked as junior professor at the Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies of the University of Marburg and was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pretoria. Furthermore, she is a resource person at the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC). Her research interests are multi-disciplinary in scope, spanning several fields of study, from agriculture and natural resource management to poverty and social impact analysis.

Further information

 

World Science Café winter term of 2016/17

Foreign Involvement in the Syrian Conflict: Status Quo and Prospects
Prof. Dr. Hussein Almohamad (Syria), Anthropogeography
Institute of Geography, Justus-Liebig-University Gießen

Syrian Cultural Heritage during the Crisis
Prof. Dr. Ammar Abdulrahman (Syria), Archeology
Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies (IANES), Eberhard Karls University Tübingen

On Refugee Lives, or A Note on Human Condition
Prof. Dr. Hande Birkalan-Gedik (Turkey), Institute of Sociology
Institute of Sociology, Goethe-University Frankfurt

World Science Café

In the event series World Science Café, fled and threatened scientists offer insights into their research

Since the winter term of 2016/17, the ZAK, in cooperation with the International Scholars & Welcome Office (IScO) has been hosting a new series of events during which refugees report about their scientific work. In line with the title-giving café concept, a brief outline will be followed by a discussion about the state of academia in the speakers’ country of origin, in dialogue with a partner who is familiar with the situation in the respective country. What are the consequences a society faces when scientists are unable to continue research in their own country? How can threatened scientists be enabled to continue their work in Germany? How do they enrich and amplify the academic world and German society?

The Philipp Schwartz Initiative was launched by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation together with the German Federal Foreign Office. It enables universities, universities of applied science, and independent research institutions to grant threatened researchers fellowships for research stays in Germany. The initiative has been made possible through generous support from the Federal Foreign Office, the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the Gerda Henkel Foundation, the Klaus Tschira Foundation, the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the Stifterverband, and the Stiftung Mercator.

World Science Café winter term of 2016/17

 

Programme:

Wednesday, 19 Juli 2017, 6 pm 
Dr. Zafer Yilmaz
Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Potsdam University

 

 

The Rise of Authoritarianism in Turkey

Transformation of Rule of Law and Suppression of Freedom of Speech

Wednesday, 19 Juli 2017, 6 pm, Venue: Foyer of the Presidential Building (Adolf Würth Building, bldg. 11.30), Ehrenhof, Engelbert-Arnold-Str. 2, KIT Campus South - Campus Map (pdf, approx. ca.1 MB)

Dr. Zafer Yilmaz

Dr. Zafer Yilmaz

Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Potsdam University

Turkish democracy is currently experiencing one of its most crucial crises since the failed coup in mid-July 2016. Right after the declaration of the State of Emergency, the government started a huge restoration process which found its repercussion in public administration, civil society and politics. The talk will discuss this recent transformation of Turkish democracy, focussing on the latest constitutional amendments, the extended State of Emergency and current political developments. Furthermore, recent political developments have been affecting the institutional structure of the state, public space and democratic politics in Turkey. Hence, they will be analysed in order to highlight the potential impact of them on the regime change in Turkey. In this context, it will be argued that these developments paved the way for the transition from authoritarian populism to “plebiscitary authoritarian regime” in Turkey. After clearing the characteristics of Turkish politics and the main tendencies which support rising authoritarianism today, the extended State of Emergency – that provides the current regime change with the necessary authority – will be at issue. Current measures towards the suppression of the freedom of speech remain right at the centre of this transition. Finally, the general characteristics of the emerging plebiscitary regime in Turkey will be outlined so as to shed light on the specific form and defining aspects of this regime. Will the current policies increase the de-institutionalisation of the state and possibly result in further erosion of state power, de-politicisation of society, suppression of the opposition and intensification of the authoritarian tendency in Turkish politics?

Dr. Zafer Yılmaz studied at the Departments of Sociology and Political Science and Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara from 1999 to 2004. He held research positions at the Department of Sociology at Free University of Berlin, the Department of Politics and History at Brunel University London and at Ankara University, where he finished his PhD on “Poverty and Uncertainty: Management of Poverty and Constitution of Social Question” in 2011. From 2013 to 2014 Yilmaz was a visiting scholar at the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Since 2017 he works as a visiting scholar at Potsdam University, at the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, Centre for Citizenship, Social Pluralism and Religious Diversity. Dr. Yilmaz has published widely and has taken part in several international conferences and workshops concerning his research interests in labour and the role of the state, tradition and the culture of political protest and, more recently, the rise of authoritarianism, transformation of rule of law and the suppression of free speech in Turkey.

 

World Science Café winter term of 2016/17

Foreign Involvement in the Syrian Conflict: Status Quo and Prospects
Prof. Dr. Hussein Almohamad (Syria), Anthropogeography
Institute of Geography, Justus-Liebig-University Gießen

Syrian Cultural Heritage during the Crisis
Prof. Dr. Ammar Abdulrahman (Syria), Archeology
Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies (IANES), Eberhard Karls University Tübingen

On Refugee Lives, or A Note on Human Condition
Prof. Dr. Hande Birkalan-Gedik (Turkey), Institute of Sociology
Institute of Sociology, Goethe-University Frankfurt